MackenzieRoussel300354473Z62mendeley

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Style assigné: Chicago manual of style (Chicago) Climate change remains a politically contentious issue in the United States 1 . Ample research shows the strong influence of political orientation (i.e., political ideology and party identification) on perceptions about the reality, causes, and seriousness of climate change 2 . At the same time, recent years have witnessed a number of weather and climate events and extremes including flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, record-breaking snowfalls, record-setting drought, and above normal temperatures in places across the contiguous U.S. Regional patterns reveal annual fluctuations in the temporal frequency and spatial distribution of these events and extremes 3 . The relevant empirical research is inconclusive, however. Some results suggest that near-term weather or longer-term climate patterns influence climate change perceptions 4 . Most of these studies only use temperature data and are thus unable to determine if broader climatic patterns influence climate change perceptions. Also, there is little agreement across these studies on how to construct a temperature trend indicator, and many of the indicators used are not informed by best practices in climatology. In addition, only a few of these studies use multilevel modeling. Properly combining individual-level geo-coded data with spatial data to precisely. Whether or not actual shifts in climate influence public perceptions of climate change remains an open question, one with important implications for societal response to climate change. We use the most comprehensive public opinion survey data on climate change available for the US to examine effects of annual and seasonal climate variation. Our results show that political orientation has the most important effect in shaping public perceptions about the timing and seriousness of climate change. Objective climatic conditions do not influence Americans' perceptions of the timing of climate change and only have a negligible effect on perceptions about the seriousness of climate change. These results suggest that further changes in climatic conditions are unlikely to produce noticeable shifts in Americans' climate change perceptions. specify regional variation and examine effects across levels (i.e., individual-level effects and regional-level effects) is essential for accurately assessing the effects of climate on individual percep- tions. Finally, a few of these studies fail to control for the most powerful individual-level predictors of climate change perception among Americans: political ideology and party identification. Indeed, consistent with the patterns found in the United States, political ideology and party identification are often significant predictors of climate change perceptions elsewhere: including in Australia 5 . 1 McCright et Dunlap, « Anti-reflexivity »; Oreskes et Conway, « Defeating the merchants of doubt ». 2 Dietz, Dan, et Shwom, « Support for Climate Change Policy: Social Psychological and Social Structural Influences* »; Hamilton, « Education, politics and opinions about climate change evidence for interaction effects »; Marquart-Pyatt et al., « Understanding public opinion on climate change: A call for research »; McCright et Dunlap, « Cool dudes: The denial of climate change among conservative white males in the United States »; Mccright et Dunlap, « The Politicization of Climate Change and Polarization in the American Public's Views of Global Warming, 2001-2010 »; O'Connor et al., « Who Wants to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions? » 3 Rahmstorf et Coumou, « Increase of extreme events in a warming world »; Trenberth et Fasullo, « Climate extremes and climate change: The Russian heat wave and other climate extremes of 2010 ». 4 Deryugina, « How do people update? The effects of local weather fluctuations on beliefs about global warming »; Egan et Mullin, « Turning personal experience into political attitudes: The effect of local weather on Americans' perceptions about global warming »; Hamilton et al., « Surveying soil faunal communities using a direct molecular approach »; Hamilton et Stampone, « Blowin' in the Wind: Short-Term Weather and Belief in Anthropogenic Climate Change »; Howe et al., « Global perceptions of local temperature change »; Scruggs et Benegal, « Declining public concern about climate change: Can we blame the great recession? »; Shao et al., « Weather, Climate, and the Economy: Explaining Risk Perceptions of Global Warming, 2001-10 »; Zahran et al., « Climate change vulnerability and policy support ». 5 Tranter, « Political divisions over climate change and environmental issues in Australia ».
Style assigné: Chicago manual of style (Chicago) Deryugina, Tatyana. « How do people update? The effects of local weather fluctuations on beliefs about global warming ». Climatic Change 118, n o 2 (1 mai 2013): 397-416. https://doi.org/10.1007/S10584-012-0615-1/FIGURES/4. Dietz, Thomas, Amy Dan, et Rachael Shwom. « Support for Climate Change Policy: Social Psychological and Social Structural Influences* ». Rural Sociology 72, n o 2 (1 juin 2007): 185-214. https://doi.org/10.1526/003601107781170026. Egan, Patrick J., et Megan Mullin. « Turning personal experience into political attitudes: The effect of local weather on Americans' perceptions about global warming ». Journal of Politics 74, n o 3 (juillet 2012): 796-809. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022381612000448/SUPPL_FILE/SUP001.DOC. Hamilton, Heather C., Michael S. Strickland, Kyle Wickings, Mark A. Bradford, et Noah Fierer. « Surveying soil faunal communities using a direct molecular approach ». Soil Biology and Biochemistry 41, n o 6 (1 juin 2009): 1311-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.SOILBIO.2009.03.021. Hamilton, Lawrence C. « Education, politics and opinions about climate change evidence for interaction effects ». Climatic Change 104, n o 2 (1 janvier 2011): 231-42. https://doi.org/10.1007/S10584-010-9957-8/METRICS. Hamilton, Lawrence C., et Mary D. Stampone. « Blowin' in the Wind: Short-Term Weather and Belief in Anthropogenic Climate Change ». Weather, Climate, and Society 5, n o 2 (1 avril 2013): 112-19. https://doi.org/10.1175/WCAS-D-12-00048.1. Howe, Peter D., Ezra M. Markowitz, Tien Ming Lee, Chia Ying Ko, et Anthony Leiserowitz. « Global perceptions of local temperature change ». Nature Climate Change 2012 3:4 3, n o 4 (16 décembre 2012): 352-56. https://doi.org/10.1038/NCLIMATE1768. Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra T., Racheal L. Shwom, Thomas Dietez, Riley E. Dunlap, Stan A. Kaplowitz, Aaron M. McCright, et Sammy Zahran. « Understanding public opinion on climate change: A call for research ». Environment 53, n o 4 (juillet 2011): 38-42. https://doi.org/10.1080/00139157.2011.588555. McCright, Aaron M., et Riley E. Dunlap. « Anti-reflexivity ». http://dx.doi.org.proxy.bib.uottawa.ca/10.1177/0263276409356001 27, n o 2 (24 mai 2010): 100-133. https://doi.org/10.1177/0263276409356001. ———. « Cool dudes: The denial of climate change among conservative white males in the United States ». Global Environmental Change 21, n o 4 (1 octobre 2011): 1163-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.GLOENVCHA.2011.06.003. Mccright, Aaron M., et Riley E. Dunlap. « The Politicization of Climate Change and Polarization in the American Public's Views of Global Warming, 2001-2010 ». The Sociological Quarterly 52, n o 2 (mars 2011): 155-94. https://doi.org/10.1111/J.1533-8525.2011.01198.X. O'Connor, Robert E., Richard J. Bord, Brent Yarnal, et Nancy Wiefek. « Who Wants to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions? » Social Science Quarterly 83, n o 1 (1 mars 2002): 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1111/1540-6237.00067. Oreskes, Naomi, et Erik M. Conway. « Defeating the merchants of doubt ». Nature 2010 465:7299 465, n o 7299 (9 juin 2010): 686-87. https://doi.org/10.1038/465686A. Rahmstorf, Stefan, et Dim Coumou. « Increase of extreme events in a warming world ». Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 108, n o 44 (1 novembre 2011): 17905-9. https://doi.org/10.1073/PNAS.1101766108/ASSET/45E632EF-D52B-4B90-8492- 5D7B773D3028/ASSETS/GRAPHIC/PNAS.1101766108EQ10.JPEG.
Style assigné: Chicago manual of style (Chicago) Scruggs, Lyle, et Salil Benegal. « Declining public concern about climate change: Can we blame the great recession? » Global Environmental Change 22, n o 2 (1 mai 2012): 505-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.GLOENVCHA.2012.01.002. Shao, Wanyun, Barry D. Keim, James C. Garand, et Lawrence C. Hamilton. « Weather, Climate, and the Economy: Explaining Risk Perceptions of Global Warming, 2001-10 ». Weather, Climate, and Society 6, n o 1 (1 janvier 2014): 119-34. https://doi.org/10.1175/WCAS-D-13-00029.1. Tranter, Bruce. « Political divisions over climate change and environmental issues in Australia ». Environmental Politics 20, n o 1 (février 2011): 78-96. https://doi.org/10.1080/09644016.2011.538167. Trenberth, Kevin E., et John T. Fasullo. « Climate extremes and climate change: The Russian heat wave and other climate extremes of 2010 ». Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 117, n o D17 (16 septembre 2012): 17103. https://doi.org/10.1029/2012JD018020. Zahran, Sammy, Samuel D. Brody, Himanshu Grover, et Arnold Vedlitz. « Climate change vulnerability and policy support ». Society and Natural Resources 19, n o 9 (octobre 2006): 771-89. https://doi.org/10.1080/08941920600835528.
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